Blog response 6

Tags

Hack, hacking and hackers- in the realm of the hackers is a documentary that provides insight into the world of hacking. Hackers are very controversial figures in society, as not many people understand what hacking actually means. When we hear the term hacking, we automatically think negatively about the person, as hacking is often associated with crime or fraud. However in today’s world hacking can be very beneficial for a multiple of reasons. The reason hacking is still associated with negative terms in the mainstream media is that hacking and technology is very complicated and not everyone understands what hacking really means. The only type of hacking we hear about in mainstream media is hacking that causes damage to a person or organization. We hear about hackers who hack into government websites in order to gain access to unauthorized information. We hear about hackers who hack into peoples back accounts in order to steal their personal banking information and money. However what we don’t hear about is the hackers that are hacking for good. One way hackers can be beneficial is they are able to help companies and organizations protect their own security by actively trying to hack into their systems. If they are able to hack into the system, the hacker will alert the company and the problem can be fixed. They are essentially placing themselves in the shoes of the bad guy in order to prevent these potential hacks from happening in the future.

Since hackers can be used for positive reasons, I feel that the mainstream media is painting an inaccurate and unfair picture of hackers. As mentioned above when we hear about hacking in mainstream media, we hear about the negative hackers, the ones hacking to cause damage or for crime purposes. Therefore I believe the medias depictions of hackers are inaccurate.

As discussed earlier, hackers can be hired by companies or organizations in order to help alert them of potential flaws in their security system. In addition to these types of hackers, there are also hackers who hack for ethical reasons. For example, many of the members of anonymous hack for ethical reasons. Hacking for ethical reasons is a form of civil disobedience, and although I do not always agree with these ethical hackers, where would our world be today without civil disobedience. One example of a hacker hacking for ethical reasons was when members of the group anonymous hacked Revenge porn king Hunter Moore. Moore created the site revenge porn king where he hacked into girls pictures and posted nude photos of them. Moore has also been accused of hiring hackers to hack into girls computers and personal information in order to obtain these photos. Anonymous was not happy with Moore thus hacked his twitter, shut down his site and did many other damager causing activities. Although two wrongs do not make a right Moore has caused much trouble to a large number of women and anonymous was sick of it. In these ethical hackers mindset they feel Moore has caused enough damage to innocent people and will continue to do so, therefore it is appropriate to cause damage to Moore and try to stop it (Kind of like Dexter if you watch it).

In my opinion although I do not always agree with the methods these ethical hackers use, or the people they choose to hack, however I do agree with ethical hacking as civil disobedience has led to many great things throughout society. Although hackers can cause a lot of damage and trouble to innocent people, hackers are portrayed inaccurately in the media and people should see both sides of the Hacking spectrum. 

Link

Comm 2f00 storify

Comm 2f00 storify

The topic of my storify is Physical education and more importantly that schools need to incorporate more Phys-ed into their curriculum and their school year. The reason schools need to intervene is due to the increasingly alarming rates of childhood obesity. Science has outlined the dangers of the disease and schools have the power to change this trend of increasing obesity rates. 

Assessing the accuracy of online journalism

Thanks Dave. You bring up a good point regarding sorting through the accurate information and the static voices. I believe this requires a base of Internet users who are media literate in order to determine which information online is accurate, and which isn’t. Unfortunately I believe that media literacy is a big problem amongst Internet users and due to the large amount of online journalists or citizens reporting on news events, often people are acquiring inaccurate information without even knowing. As (Hermida, 2012) outlines in the article Tweets and Truth: Journalism as a discipline of collaborative verification, online journalism is rapidly expanding and there is a mass amount of people who report on events and news topics that are not actual journalists. This can leave people with an overwhelming amount of information making it difficult to sift out which is accurate and which is not. Personally I use a couple key indicators too verify if information is accurate or not. One thing I look for is if the information is objective of subjective. If a person is providing facts with proof of the facts from reliable sources, regardless of their popularity of who they are I will put stock into their work. In contrast, if someone is blogging about an event merely sharing their opinion I tend to take the story with a grain of salt. Another way I sort through the noise and find accurate information is by examining the journalist’s social profile, or how they carry themselves and express themselves online. For example, if a journalist on twitter is tweeting offensive, or unprofessional things, or behaving in a manner not consistent with well respected journalists I tend to devalue the information significantly. Additionally to their conduct online, I look at their grammar and spelling. Although simple, these can be key indicators about if the user is a reliable journalist or simply a teenager behind a computer stating their opinion. As (Freidman, 2011) taught us, the Internet has provided people with a platform not only to consume, but to create media and take the role of a journalist, regardless of who they are.

 

 

Friedman, S. M. (2011). Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima: An analysis of traditional and new media coverage of nuclear accidents and radiationBulletin Of The Atomic Scientists, 67(5), 55-65.

 

Hermida, A. (2012). TWEETS AND TRUTH: Journalism as a discipline of collaborative verificationJournalism Practice. 6:5-6, p659-668.

 

 

The new form of journalism

With the advent of the Internet, and then more importantly social media, the world has changed a substantial amount. One main way we have seen a shift is in the way people obtain their news and information. Myself as an example uses twitter as one of my main news sources. The benefit of twitter is it has such a large variety of topics covered by such a large amount of people. It provides different perspectives on subjects that range from anything to world news, to local news. The problem with TV and using it as a primary source for news is that TV usually only provides one perspective and you are only able to obtain the information the news station chooses to provide. On the Internet however there are perspectives by a wide variety of people covering the story and additionally, you are able to search more and obtain further information on a subject if wanted.  As (Friedman, 2011) notes, the Internet has provided people with a large share of information on news topics, especially through the use of social media. This leads to guiding question #2; yes these opportunities encourage me to participate more directly in citizen journalism. Social media, and specifically twitter has made it incredible easy to cover an event or share news with others. Additionally it has made it easier to participate in social activism as one can share their opinion on a topic, or comment and engage with other people who are interested in the similar topic. (Hermida, 2012) explains that the practice of journalism is rapidly expanding, as there are a variety of individuals who report on events that are not actual journalists. This is what allows people to see many different perspectives and thoughts about certain issues and is what has made it easier to participate in citizen journalism and social activism.

 

 

Friedman, S. M. (2011). Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima: An analysis of traditional and new media coverage of nuclear accidents and radiationBulletin Of The Atomic Scientists, 67(5), 55-65.

 

Hermida, A. (2012). TWEETS AND TRUTH: Journalism as a discipline of collaborative verificationJournalism Practice. 6:5-6, p659-668.

Link

Comm 2f00 podcast

Comm 2f00 podcast

The reason I chose the passage I did was because I feel it summed up a lot of issues I agree with in a more articulate way. Additionally I hope to be a gym teacher one day and feel strongly about the importance of physical education in schools. 

Cale, L., & Harris, J. (2013). ‘Every child (of every size) matters’ in physical education! Physical education’s role in childhood obesity. School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences18, 433-452.

 

Its time for the music industry to wake up

In my first post I mentioned VHS’ and CD’s and how the music industry was worried when they were introduced, yet continued to thrive. The comment on my blog brings up an interesting point asking “Do you think these advances simple made music and videos more appealing to larger numbers of people, thus making more money for the industry?” Yes I think this is exactly the case and I think that way the internet and social media has changed the world has really benefited the music industry as people are able to get their music out much easier. As (Bradley, 2006) outlines, downloading and sharing music online has become extremely popular due to companies like Napster and others similar. Another company that has made the sharing of music online incredible easy is YouTube. Create a funny or talented video and within hours you can be a worldwide sensation. Getting famous on YouTube has become the norm. In today’s technological world, music artists rarely work their way up to stardom through any other platform than social media and the Internet. Justin Bieber for example, one of the most successful, talented young men in the world; famous from a YouTube video. This is the reality of the world we live in. Everything is interconnected and time and space barriers have virtually been eliminated. Rather than resist the changes in the world the music industry has begun to and needs to continue to embrace them in order to stay successful. (Steinmetz and Tunnell 2013) mention the music industry views the sharing and downloading of music as piracy however through the ability to share your music online, the Internet has provided the music industry with much opportunity. Its time for the music industry to wake up and realize the massive potential in using the Internet to share and make their music more appealing to larger audiences.  

 

Bradley, D. (2006) Scenes of Transmission: Youth Culture, MP3 File Sharing, and Transferable Strategies of Cultural PracticeM/C Journal. 9(1).

 Steinmetz, K., K. Tunnell (2013). Under the Pixelated Jolly Roger: A Study of On-Line PiratesDeviant Behavior. 34 (1), pg. 53-67 

Sharing music and the music industry

Downloading and sharing music online has become extremely popular due to companies such as Napster (Bradley, 2006). Due to Napster and their model of music sharing, downloading and sharing music and media content is now as simple as ever. The recording industry however has deemed the sharing of music as piracy and have struggled with how to deal with this form of piracy. Guiding question number 2 asks what suggestions would I make to the music industry with regards to how to deal with this type of piracy and I would suggest they just give up. The reality is, its impossible to monitor the sharing of online music. The other day I was watching the news program The National and they were discussing the cost it would take to go after these online producers and distributors of music. They estimated it would cost over 4million dollars to acquire about $45000 worth of fees. The numbers are not worth it for the music industry and the online distribution of music is almost impossible to monitor.

Another suggestion for the music industry is to rethink their definition of piracy. As (Steinmetz and Tunnell 2013) state, the idea of file sharing or downloading intellectual property has been termed as piracy by the recording industry. Online music sharing is similar to sharing photos online. In the technological age we live in, once its on the internet, its there for ever and can be used by anyone for any purpose. Therefore by labeling online music sharing as piracy the music industry is creating a problem that can never be reversed.

The media industry is so strong and powerful it will survive any technological interference with their profit. There was worry when the VHS came out and similarly with the CD but the music industry continued to thrive and is just as strong as its ever been. 

 

Steinmetz, K., K. Tunnell (2013). Under the Pixelated Jolly Roger: A Study of On-Line PiratesDeviant Behavior. 34 (1), pg. 53-67 

 

Copyright pt 2

When looking at information online, it is not always easy determining if something is original or not. If I were to read an online blog, and then create my own blog with the exact same information the majority of people who visit my blog would believe those are my thoughts and ideas. While online, it’s a difficult task monitoring whose thoughts are original and who’s aren’t. There are millions of posts on millions of sites each day and the amount of information being transferred all over the world is massive. In order to create a community of robust online users I believe creating stricter copyright laws is not the best answer. By creating these laws we are restricting freedom of expression and creativity. We are also restricting people from using the information produced online for good. Students for example are unable to view some valuable information due to strict copyright laws. When you post something online you are exposing it to a community of over a billion people. Your thoughts are subject to criticism, comments, and opinions just as media pieces are, or any opinion in real life. If others want to post an opinion about what you have posted they are allowed too. Freedom of speech on the Internet is a valuable right. I am not arguing for people who plagiarize others work as I believe they are in the wrong, however many Internet users struggle with the differences between copyright protection and the freedom of expression. If we educate users on the differences we can work to creating a robust online community with fair and protective copyright laws. 

Is that copyright?

Copyright laws have been a topic of discussion recently as they are changing and becoming more and more restrictive. Additionally, monitoring issues regarding copyright is an extremely difficult task as billions of pieces of media are exposed to the Internet and tracking where they come from can be nearly impossible.  The article “The Practice of Everyday Media Life” uses blogs as an example to show how tracking an idea is nearly impossible. It mentions that often blog entries are comments or opinions about an idea copied from another user online. Therefore although producers of information want to protect their information I believe that in today’s world, once you post content online it is subject to criticism, comments, opinions and more from online consumers. This is simply due to the massive amount of online users. Additionally as the article “The cultural logic of media convergence” points out the new innovative media technologies have made sharing and producing media an easy task by reducing cost and improving efficiency. There are also a wide variety of delivery platforms that allow users to distribute their media easily. Due to this, building a robust and freely accessible cultural commons in the face of restrictive copy laws can be very difficult. I think it’s important to not the difference between copyright issues and discussing of commenting on media. For example, if someone were to publish a study and I were to blog about the study claiming it’s my study then I would be in violation of copyright laws. However if I were to make it clear I did not produce the study and write a blog criticizing the study I am simply referring to the idea in the copyright content, not copying it. I believe that these negotiations between media producers and large industries trying to protect their online media are difficult however by understand and making people aware of the difference between copyright issues and discussing the media we can work to building a robust online community where peoples information is protected however information is also freely accessible.

 

Manovich, l. (2008) The Practice of Everyday (Media) Life: From Mass Consumption to Mass Cultural Production?

Jenkins, H. (2004) The Cultural Logic of Media Convergence  International Journal of Cultural Studies March 2004 7: 33-43